Ninety-seven stars out of 100 in my first 20 reviews on Amazon

My novel, ‘My Cup Runneth Over’, has scored 97 stars out of the maximum possible of 100 in its first 20 reviews at Amazon UK! 🙂

If you go to the Amazon website, the easiest was to find the book is to search for my pen-name of Steve Shearwater.

Overwhelming reward for the moments of self-doubt while writing my novel: My Cup Runneth Over

10 December 2016

I have already had many delightful and complimentary comments from people who have read my first novel and I have been humbled by their kindness and their faith in me. However, the latest addition to the ranks of these comments has virtually left even my fingers “type-struck” about what to say in reply.

Richard Wallace, whom I hope will not mind me adding the fact that he is the former Senior Lecturer in Classics at Keele University, has written this of my work:

This man can write!

I was half way down the third page when it suddenly came to me –  “This man can write!”  It is a beautifully written book – the narrative carries you effortlessly on – a real “page turner” as they say; the evocation of the landscape and the local people is wonderfully vivid; and the mixture of drama, humour, and the facts of real life makes for a very rich read.

The subject is the experiences of a police constable in Cumbria in the 70s.  The reader does need to keep the time-frame in mind, otherwise some of the policing practices and social attitudes seem very odd indeed (and I am prepared to bet the processes whereby these practices and attitudes change will be a rich source of material in later books in the series). Inevitably it consists of a series of episodes, linked by recurring themes.  The challenge for an author using this format is to fill out the characters in the brief space available.  Shearwater does this well (but leaves the reader eager to find out more about these fascinating individuals in later books).  Some have compared the book to James Herriot’s “All Creatures Great and Small” books, which is fair enough, though Shearwater’s novel is, to my mind, a little darker, a little more real, and a little less “feel good”.   I like that.

One of the most attractive features of the novel is the lively and evocative scenes of Cumbria, its people, and its landscape.  I particularly enjoyed a marvellous description of a winter walk over High Street.  You could feel the crunch of the snow under your boots, the cold wind on your face, and the exhilaration of getting to the top and just looking at the views.  I wanted to be there!

In short, this is a great read, and I strongly recommend it.  I am looking forward eagerly to the next episode.  And it would make a superb television series!

_______________

Saying a mere “thank you” to Richard for these remarks feels remarkly inadequate.

The last few signing sessions for my Cumbria/Police novel until later next year!

After a hectic two weeks when I’ve been all over north Lakeland and north Cumbria, we are now down to the last few book signing sessions of my Cumbria police novel, ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ (readers’ feedback here), before I head back to much snowier climes in the USA!

Here are the locations, dates and times.  Wherever and whenever possible, I hope that we can all support our invaluable local bookshops rather than online alternatives – a classic case of “if we don’t use them, we lose them!”

Wednesday, 7 December 2016

2:30-3:30pm   – Bookends Carlisle, 19 Castle Street. 

Thursday, 8 December 2016

11:00-11:30am – Bookends Keswick, 66 Main Street.

3:00-4:00pm  – Farrer’s Tea and Coffee House, 13 Stricklandgate, Kendal

Friday, 9 December 2016

10:30-11:30am – Threlkeld Coffee Shop, the Public Room, Threlkeld

Book-signing sessions in Cumbria for week commencing Monday, 5 December 2016

Tuesday, 6 December

COCKERMOUTH:  09:30-10:30, New Bookshop, Main Street

(WORKINGTON – provisional – 11:15-12noon -venue not decided – attendance numbers needed)

(WHITEHAVEN – provisional – 1:30-2:30pm but possibly sooner -venue not decided – attendance numbers needed)

Wednesday, 7 December

PENRITH and CARLISLE are likely for this date.  Please let me know if you would attend either of these locations.

Thursday, 8 December

KESWICK:  11:00-11:30am, Bookends, Main Street

KENDAL:   3:00pm-4:00pm, Farrer’s Coffee Shop, Stricklandgate

Friday, 9 December

THRELKELD PUBLIC HALL coffee bar:  10:30-11:30am

Saturday, 10 December

(ULVERSTON – provisional – attendance numbers being sought – venue t.b.a.)

(BARROW-IN-FURNESS: possible)

The first ‘official’ photo of Steve Shearwater!

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It has now become common knowledge that Steve Shearwater is the pen-name of Eddie Wren, author of Cumbria police novels, the first of which is ‘My Cup Runneth Over’.

You can view reader responses here.

Great fun, signing and selling books at a Christmas Fair in Aspatria

Just after I arrived at the Community Centre, yesterday, I was delighted to have a long chat with Mary Bragg of Cockermouth, who had just finished reading my new novel – ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ – on Kindle, the evening before, and who was wonderfully complimentary about it. Thank you, Mary

I confess that I also sold more books than I had dared anticipate, so that was very pleasing, too.

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Eddie Wren (alias Steve Shearwater), L, and Peter Reece

Then Peter Reece – one of my former colleagues in crime (fighting!) – appeared, following his own grin into the room, and when I wasn’t busy with people at my little sales’ table, we naturally had great fun swapping old ‘war stories’. (I’m the one on the left, in the photo, and Peter would tell you he’s the better-looking one, on the right!)

Incidentally, the little town is pronounced “Sp’yatri,” in Cumberland dialect but gets its proper name from ‘Ash Patrick’, after the famous saint preached there in the Fifth Century.  Another Cumbrian place name that comes from the saint is Patterdale – Patrick’s dale – at Ullswater.

Interestingly, despite its small size, both Peter and I worked at Aspatria years ago, during our respective police careers.

All told, the Fair provided a wonderful afternoon. My sincere thanks to the organisers.