A 2015 interview with Cumbria’s Chief Constable about Police cuts – and it’s sadly worth re-watching

Back in 2015, Cumbria’s Chief Constable Jerry Graham spoke out against proposals for further cuts which would leave policing in Cumbria “unrecognisable”.

The article in 2015 continued:  If these cuts were to be finalised Cumbria would lose the highest proportion of our budget out of all the forces in England and Wales.

The cuts would mean the end of policing in Cumbria as we know it, and would result in “serious degrading of policing for the county”.

In this video he outlines his concerns, and asks the public if they value their police service to do something about it by joining in the conversation on social media at #PolicingCumbria

Details on budget figures and a quote from the Police and Crime Commissioner Richard Rhodes can be found here: http://www.cumbria-pcc.gov.uk/news/police-funding.aspx

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The above post was forwarded to me recently by my friend and former police colleague, Cliff Heaney, who very understandably asks: What next?

The situation, in terms of future law and order on the streets and in the countryside of England and Wales, cannot be good.

Steve Shearwater,

1 June 2017

Increased racist hate crimes in Cumbria and the rest of Britain

A journalist writing a Cumbrian article about hate crimes used an unfortunate choice of words when he said: “The UK’s decision to leave the EU coincided with a spike in hate crimes across Cumbria…”

It was not a coincidence, it was the straightforward fact that moronic, malevolent racists used the referendum result as a facile and wicked excuse to hurt other people.  End of story.

Another part of the equation undoubtedly involves the fact that in the past few years the UK Government has caused vicious financial cuts on all police forces, as a result of which the number of officers everywhere has been seriously reduced – more racist trouble, less officers to help reduce or prevent it.  This already is a sign of things to come, such as the current pervasive increase in road deaths in Britain when, for over thirty years we have been one of the equal two top countries for road safety in the world, largely as a result of excellent standards of enforcement (one of the vital “3E’s” of road-death reduction).  Again, far fewer officers means  bigger problems – in this case more deaths.

Finally, may I add that if the do-gooders or perhaps the social workers of this world want to say that it’s not good for the police to think of certain people as being – say – “moronic, malevolent racists,” it is important that they remember that expertise in this field is multi-disciplinary and requires that police knowledge and experience be given just as much  weight as their own beliefs or skills.