All about Carleton Hall – Cumbria Police H.Q.

History

The ‘mesne manor’ of Carleton Hall, one mile south-east of Penrith, was “formerly the residence of the ancient family of the Carletons, who appear to have been settled here from soon after the time of the conquest, until the failure of male issue by the death of Robert Carleton, Esq., in 1707.”[1]  This occurred after seven successive generations of Thomas Carletons as the ‘man of the house’, and the Hall was then purchased by John Pattinson of Penrith, attorney-at-law.[2]

The south east side of Carleton Hall, Cumbria Police Headquarters, at Penrith. Strictly copyright, 1979, Eddie Wren. All rights reserved.

In 1828, Thomas Lord Wallace sold the hall and manor to John Cowper, Esq.  “The grounds and walks owe many of their attractions to the correct taste of Mrs Wallace, widow of James Wallace, Esq., His Majesty’s Attorney-General, and mother of the above-named Lord Wallace.  That lady succeeded in rendering Carleton one of the most beautiful spots in this part of England…”[1]

During the first half of the twentieth century it was the home of the Carleton-Cowper family.

The Grade II* Listed Building is described as early 18th Century, with alterations made later that century.  It was restored in 1859 and partly rebuilt in 1937.[3]

The name ‘Carleton’ originates from the Old English words ‘ceorl, ‘carle’ or ‘charle’, which mean ‘farmer’ or ‘free peasant’, plus ‘tūn’ a ‘vill’ or ‘settlement’. The meaning is therefore: ‘settlement of farmers’, as a result of which prolific originations the place names and surnames of Carlton, Carleton and Charlton are quite common in England.[4]

During the war years of 1940-43 the hall was occupied by the Furze Close School and from 1943-46 it was a military hospital.

Police Years

In May, 1950, the hall was occupied by the Cumberland and Westmorland Constabulary, forerunner of the Cumbria Constabulary which in turn came into existence when the modern, non-metropolitan county of Cumbria was created in May 1974, at which time both entities absorbed small areas from North Yorkshire (the Sedbergh area) and Lancashire (the South Lakes and Furness). Cumbria is the second-largest county in England, at 2613 sq.ml. (6,767 sq.km.).

An intake of cadets on the south east steps of Carleton Hall Police H.Q. in the late 1970s, Photo copyright, Eddie Wren, 1979. All rights reserved.

Related old buildings nearby which used to be the stables, carriage houses, etc., frame three sides of a courtyard which during police years has been known as the ‘traffic yard’, where the vehicle repair garages are located.  The rest of the police headquarters consists of modern buildings of various ages.

Recollections

Steve Shearwater:  When I was stationed at H.Q. Traffic (nowadays known as the Roads Policing Unit), back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the main entrance foyer  of the old building at Carleton Hall was still lined with large, grand oil paintings, with eyes that — according to several of my former ‘control room’ colleagues who like myself used to do security checks through the hall at all hours of night — would “follow you around,” always seeming to be looking at you wherever you walked.  Given that the only illumination, by necessity for security checks, was a small flashlight, the autonomous, random creaking of ancient floorboards and the legend of the ‘grey lady’ ghost added to the experience!  I presume that the oil paintings and the grey lady are all still there.

Specifically on the subject of the ghost, Gordon Mackenzie fascinatingly writes: “I would be about 7 or 8, so maybe 1965/6, my dad [the headquarters caretaker] had a workshop in the cellar of Carleton Hall next to the Armoury and which was eventually used to store weapons in about the 1970’s.  We used to live in one of the cottages which became the printing Dept in 1977 and I used to go and see the old man at night in his workshop, no security in those days.  I asked him one day about the ghost.  My Dad was very private and we had a struggle to get anything out of him about his childhood and war service, but this night he opened up to me about the ‘grey lady’. He said that he saw her on several occasions and not to be scared of her, and that she had a friendly face and was a guardian of Carleton Hall. She was searching for her baby daughter that her husband had killed in a fit of anger because he wanted a son and heir! The old man never spoke about the ‘grey lady’ again and would not repeat what he said to me, he denied it.   A long time ago but one of those moments in my life that I will never forget.   Carleton Hall can be a bit spooky to some but we never felt anything like that, I suppose we were used to it having grown up there.”

In this context, Heather Thompson has mentioned that some of the staff in the Admin. Dept., located in the actual Hall, hated working overtime because when it was time to leave they found the deserted building creepy.

Steve Shearwater

More recollections from serving/retired police officers and staff about any suitable H.Q. topics would be very welcome for inclusion on this page (side-issue pages can easily be added). Please post any pertinent, non-controversial comments in the ‘Replies’ box, below, and if possible perhaps also send digitised images for inclusion (all info & images will be credited to the sender).

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Sources

  1. The history and antiquities of Cumberland: with biographical notices and memoirs, 1840, by Samuel Jefferson, Vol. 1; pages 93-4.
  2. The history and antiquities of the counties of Westmorland and Cumberland, Vol. 2; pages 403-4.
  3. British Listed Buildings
  4. Wikipedia

Acknowledgements (other than those mentioned in the actual article, above):

  • Mark Jenkins

Author: Steve

Steve Shearwater, the author of this series of books and admin of this website and blog.

3 thoughts on “All about Carleton Hall – Cumbria Police H.Q.”

  1. Steve/Eddie,
    David Tweddle (ex D.I. SB) sent me your link on Carleton Hall. I hope you can remember me and my brother Ian (PC 675). We were born and grew up at Carleton Hall, father (Mac) was the caretaker and eventually the Museum Curator until his death in 1994.. I still work having left Cumbria in 2002 to work for Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary. Ian is a firearms licensing officer. I am happy to assist you if needs be. Good luck. Best wishes, Gordon Mackenzie

    1. Yes, indeed I do clearly remember both of you (although it is now almost exactly 35 years since I left headquarters!). Your help with any interesting/amusing info about Carleton Hall — including anecdotal topics — would be immensely helpful, please. It’s great to hear from you and I hope both families are well.

      1. 31 years! Wow! I could write a book too, but many stories are incriminating I am afraid.
        As for the ghost I know of a few ” stories” without evidence that have been handed down, with one exception.
        I would be about 7 or 8 so maybe 1965/6, my dad had a workshop in the cellar of Carleton Hall next to the Armoury and was eventually used to store weapons in About the 1970’s.
        We used to live in one of the cottages which became the printing Dept in 1977 and I used to go and see the old man at night in his workshop, no security in those days.
        I asked him one day about the “grey lady” ghost and my Dad was very private and we had a struggle to get anything out of him about his childhood and war service, but this night he opened up to me about the “grey lady” . He said that he saw her on several occasions and not to be scared of her, and that she had a friendly face and was a guardian of Carleton Hall. She was searching for her baby daughter that her husband had killed in a fit of anger because he wanted a son and heir! The old man never spoke about the “grey lady” again and would not repeat what he said to me, he denied it.
        A long time ago but one of those moments in my life that I will never forget.
        Carleton Hall can be a bit spooky to some but we never felt anything like that, I suppose we were used to it having grown up there.

        I hope all is well with you, I am thinking that you live in the Grange area but not sure.
        Cheers

        Gordon

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