A 2015 interview with Cumbria’s Chief Constable about Police cuts – and it’s sadly worth re-watching

Back in 2015, Cumbria’s Chief Constable Jerry Graham spoke out against proposals for further cuts which would leave policing in Cumbria “unrecognisable”.

The article in 2015 continued:  If these cuts were to be finalised Cumbria would lose the highest proportion of our budget out of all the forces in England and Wales.

The cuts would mean the end of policing in Cumbria as we know it, and would result in “serious degrading of policing for the county”.

In this video he outlines his concerns, and asks the public if they value their police service to do something about it by joining in the conversation on social media at #PolicingCumbria

Details on budget figures and a quote from the Police and Crime Commissioner Richard Rhodes can be found here: http://www.cumbria-pcc.gov.uk/news/police-funding.aspx

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The above post was forwarded to me recently by my friend and former police colleague, Cliff Heaney, who very understandably asks: What next?

The situation, in terms of future law and order on the streets and in the countryside of England and Wales, cannot be good.

Steve Shearwater,

1 June 2017

Help with UK police jargon & Cumbrian dialect words, for overseas readers

It was obvious from the outset that I couldn’t write an accurate police story without using the appropriate ‘period jargon’ and that similarly my novel couldn’t capture the fabulous aura and personality of the Cumbrian people without including dialect speech.  But if these aspects might put off some readers from outside Britain, don’t worry; help is literally at hand!

“Blues & Twos” – driving at speed, using the flashing blue lights and two-tone sirens (now multi-tone, but the nickname persists)

Simply have your laptop, tablet or smartphone handy when you are reading and if you find any confusing words or phrases click on the tabs at the top of each page of the website, for either — unsurprisingly — ‘Police Jargon’ or ‘Dialect’, and your confusion will disappear!  (And if it doesn’t, please tell me and I’ll fire the person who wrote this!!! 🙂 )

Steve Shearwater

Purchase the Cumbria Police Novel ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ here

The Facebook page ‘Cumbria Police Novels’ (which is the ‘tag line’ at the top of each page and blog post on this website) now has both the paperback and Kindle versions of ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ on sale through Amazon UK. British readers click here.

Readers in the USA, Canada and other countries, click here.

 

 

 

Book review of ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ by the ‘Cumbria’ magazine – Part I

This month (February 2017) Cumbria magazine has published a much-shortened chapter from my novel – ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ – and next month they are kindly adding a review of the whole book.

Clearly, a book about being a young police officer stationed at a town in the stunningly beautiful Lake District National Park in the north-west corner of England has interest for British folks who know the Lake District but it has also been written to appeal to people from other countries, too – particularly those of you from the USA, where I have lived for over ten years.

Is this another example of the so-called, cultural ‘British Invasion’ in the USA?  I’d like to think so but as this is my first novel it would be silly of me to actually believe that.  I have, however, had the delightful good fortune to have had the style and humour of my novel repeatedly compared to the wonderful books by the famous veterinary surgeon James Herriot.

Remembering as well that even today the vast majority of British police officers do not carry lethal weapons, the novel offers a great insight into how such unarmed officers can operate in general safety and it also gives a great insight into rural life in England’s  second-largest and most scenic county – home of the famed ‘Lakes Poets’ such as William Wordsworth.

Dialect and police jargon are included in the writing but they are carefully explained in glossaries on the website – see the link below – so nobody need struggle to understand these fascinating cultural aspects. (The Lakeland dialect, for example, is strongly based upon Old Norse, from Viking times.)

And then, of course, there’s the crime aspect!  Naturally, none of the crimes or criminals in the book are actual events or real people, but each has been developed from my own lengthy experience in the police and the events are therefore very true-to-life and accurate in terms of police procedure back in the 1970s where the story is set.

Read here how readers from around the world have responded so wonderfully to My Cup Runneth Over.

Purchase the book (including USA) here.