Purchase the Cumbria Police Novel ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ here

The Facebook page ‘Cumbria Police Novels’ (which is the ‘tag line’ at the top of each page and blog post on this website) now has both the paperback and Kindle versions of ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ on sale through Amazon UK. British readers click here.

Readers in the USA, Canada and other countries, click here.

 

 

 

Increased racist hate crimes in Cumbria and the rest of Britain

A journalist writing a Cumbrian article about hate crimes used an unfortunate choice of words when he said: “The UK’s decision to leave the EU coincided with a spike in hate crimes across Cumbria…”

It was not a coincidence, it was the straightforward fact that moronic, malevolent racists used the referendum result as a facile and wicked excuse to hurt other people.  End of story.

Another part of the equation undoubtedly involves the fact that in the past few years the UK Government has caused vicious financial cuts on all police forces, as a result of which the number of officers everywhere has been seriously reduced – more racist trouble, less officers to help reduce or prevent it.  This already is a sign of things to come, such as the current pervasive increase in road deaths in Britain when, for over thirty years we have been one of the equal two top countries for road safety in the world, largely as a result of excellent standards of enforcement (one of the vital “3E’s” of road-death reduction).  Again, far fewer officers means  bigger problems – in this case more deaths.

Finally, may I add that if the do-gooders or perhaps the social workers of this world want to say that it’s not good for the police to think of certain people as being – say – “moronic, malevolent racists,” it is important that they remember that expertise in this field is multi-disciplinary and requires that police knowledge and experience be given just as much  weight as their own beliefs or skills.

Cumbria’s first female police officer, 100 years ago.

. Mabel Farrar is the sergeant, front centre. The other officers may have nothing to do with Cumbria.

The research for this interesting point in history regarding the area’s first female police officer was done in 2015 by asking the public about the matter.  As it turned out, it would appear that the first one may have been Mabel Farrer, who stared work over the border in Gretna in January 1917. But “as well as being employed by the Women Police Service, Mabel was also sworn in as a Special Constable for Dumfrieshire, Cumberland, and the City of Carlisle. Part of her time was spent in Carlisle and when there she reported to the Chief Constable…”

Read the full article, from Cumbria Crack.

Police Officers’ Roll of Honour for the Cumbria Constabulary

This Roll of Honour, starting in 1835, also includes officers who were killed or died while on duty in the earlier constituent police forces of:

  • The Borough of Kendal
  • Kendal Borough Police
  • Carlisle City Police
  • Cumberland and Westmorland Constabulary
  • Cumberland, Westmorland and Carlisle Constabulary

Click here to view

 

A new dialect list for agricultural and farming words in Cumbria. Would you like to help?

As a young police officer who quite often had to deal with farmers in order to enforce such as the stock movement laws designed to minimise risks from livestock diseases such as foot and mouth (USA: ‘hoof and mouth’), I was frequently faced with solid dialect speech.  Having been born and raised in the Lake District, and having worked as a lad on several farms during school holidays, I wasn’t troubled by the dialect — indeed, I loved it — but sadly this delightful aspect of our Cumbrian culture has been fading for decades.  This has given me a determination to preserve at least some bits of it in my writing.

A lot of my long-term and new-found friends in various Cumbrian groups within Facebook have contributed a lot to the now-growing list of general dialect words on the steveshearwater.co.uk website and it has been so successful that I’m now asking for everyone’s help with a list of specifically farming-related dialect words, which I think may be unique once it’s created in sufficient depth.

Many agricultural words undoubtedly are found across larger areas than just our county of Cumbria so their inclusion in the imminent list may be short-term until we establish for certain whether they are unique to the dialect or not.  Also included will be dialect/regional words for features found in the ‘statesman farmer’ type of houses that were built here in the 18th Century and for other types of farm buildings.

If you want to participate and suggest some agricultural dialect words please reply to this message on Facebook or submit your answers on a ‘Reply’ within this message on the steveshearwater.co.uk  website.

Finally, on the shearwater website there is now the facility for readers to ‘like’ individual pages and posts so I would be very grateful if you would click the ‘Like’ buttons at the bottom of any pages you approve of.  (There are also buttons allowing you to ‘share’ those pages straight to Facebook, Twitter or Google+, so please feel free to use those, too, if you wish.

One last thing, if you want to help with the creation of this presumably unique list, you will have to do well to beat the West Cumbrians because they submitted far, far more suggestions than everyone else combined, for the general list.  Come on, everyone else in Cumbria…. or will you let them win hands down, once again? !!! 😀

Astonishing Amazon ‘star’ scores for the police novel ‘My Cup Runneth Over’

As of 12 February I have been lucky enough to get 40 reader reviews on the amazon.co.uk website (at least ten more needed, please*) and eight on amazon.com website (at least 42 more needed, please!*).

Each reader making one of those reviews can award up to five stars for the book and for the 40 reviews on the UK site I lost just three stars from the possible total of 200 – an astonishing and delightful score of 98.5%.

Full front and back cover for My Cup Runneth Over

The dot-com (USA and global) website so far has only eight reviews,  something that researchers would call a small ‘sample size’, so it is nowhere near as reliable regarding the quality and enjoyability of my novel, but even so, to date I haven’t lost any stars at all there so I’m running at 100% for now.

Thanks to ALL of you have taken the time to write any review or opinion of my book, but may I ask that for those of you who have not yet done so on any of the Amazon websites, it would help me tremendously if you could copy and paste you remarks that have been posted here on the steveshearwater.co.uk  website and put them on the relevant Amazon site please.  Likewise for anybody who has not posted one at all, please consider doing a review for me on the relevant Amazon website.  You do not need to have bought the book from Amazon in order to do this.  Just go to the site, search for Steve Shearwater (in the ‘books’ section if you are given that option) and when you find the book you should get the opportunity to ‘write a review’.

If you can do this it will help me tremendously with promoting the book – a financially and embarrassingly necessary activity for authors in this day and age – because when I reach 50 reviews on each of the two above sites (see the asterisks * in the first paragraph) Amazon will actually start promoting the book on those websites, something that is vital for my success if I’m going to carry on and write the full ‘Cumbria Police Novels’ series.  Thank you in anticipation.

Purchase the book here.

Request for a favour from readers of my novel: My Cup Runneth Over

I’m asking a big favour from anyone who likes my first novel, ‘My Cup Runneth Over’, please (even if you have already sent complimentary remarks directly to me or via Facebook).

Whether or not you have previously commented on the book – for which your collective kindness in what you have all written has been unbelievable – the most important and valuable comments for me are those that are posted on either the amazon.co.uk or the amazon.com websites where, in both cases, it is best to search for ‘Steve Shearwater’ (in the ‘books’ category if at the dot-com site) rather than for the name of the book, because there are several books with the same title. Of course, some of you already have commented on Amazon, for which I’m very grateful, and so you are exempt from this request!

When I can get enough positive reviews on each of those Amazon websites, and **I need at least 50 on each,** algorithms are triggered which would mean that the Amazon sites would then actually promote and advertise my book to other readers; something that is vital to me if I’m going to make this venture financially viable so that I can keep writing the other novels in the series.

You do NOT need to have bought your book direct from Amazon in order for you to make a comment there, it can be a book that was purchased at a bookshop or directly from myself. All they would then want is confirmation of who you are (so that one person can’t submit multiple comments).

It does NOT need to be anything lengthy; a simple “I liked the book” (or whatever) would suffice, although more detail is great, too.

For those of you who have already kindly sent me comments that are not yet on Amazon but are on the Readers’ Comments page on my website, do please see if you can find time to copy your original comment from there, edited if necessary, and paste it on the relevant Amazon page. My comments page is here.

Many thanks in anticipation.  This would really help me move forward with the planned series of novels.

Book review of ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ by the ‘Cumbria’ magazine – Part I

This month (February 2017) Cumbria magazine has published a much-shortened chapter from my novel – ‘My Cup Runneth Over’ – and next month they are kindly adding a review of the whole book.

Clearly, a book about being a young police officer stationed at a town in the stunningly beautiful Lake District National Park in the north-west corner of England has interest for British folks who know the Lake District but it has also been written to appeal to people from other countries, too – particularly those of you from the USA, where I have lived for over ten years.

Is this another example of the so-called, cultural ‘British Invasion’ in the USA?  I’d like to think so but as this is my first novel it would be silly of me to actually believe that.  I have, however, had the delightful good fortune to have had the style and humour of my novel repeatedly compared to the wonderful books by the famous veterinary surgeon James Herriot.

Remembering as well that even today the vast majority of British police officers do not carry lethal weapons, the novel offers a great insight into how such unarmed officers can operate in general safety and it also gives a great insight into rural life in England’s  second-largest and most scenic county – home of the famed ‘Lakes Poets’ such as William Wordsworth.

Dialect and police jargon are included in the writing but they are carefully explained in glossaries on the website – see the link below – so nobody need struggle to understand these fascinating cultural aspects. (The Lakeland dialect, for example, is strongly based upon Old Norse, from Viking times.)

And then, of course, there’s the crime aspect!  Naturally, none of the crimes or criminals in the book are actual events or real people, but each has been developed from my own lengthy experience in the police and the events are therefore very true-to-life and accurate in terms of police procedure back in the 1970s where the story is set.

Read here how readers from around the world have responded so wonderfully to My Cup Runneth Over.

Purchase the book (including USA) here.